faicd11: Historiallisia harmonikkalevytyksiä 2
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Tracks:
Homan'in marssi (Repaz Band)
2:51
Säk'järven polka
2:52
Kyyneleet
2:43
Paluumarssi (Pietro's Return)
3:34
Karjalan jääkarin marssi
3:03
Viipurin jenkka
2:51
Aaltotanssi
2:50
Imatran Hilma
2:23
Meidän sotiisi (Hours-Schottische)
3:03
Voittajien marssi
3:05
Onneton
2:55
Uusi Bublitsky
2:43
Vivisita (Vivacity)
2:34
Kasakka-polkka
2:51
Black and White
2:52
Irti maasta
2:37
Huoleton merimies
3:12
Tukkipojan jenkka
3:03
Postimies-valssi (Postman-Waltz)
3:04
Ukko-Pekan polka
3:20
Hullunpolkka (Viljon polka)
2:50
Tamara tanssii
3:00
Espanjan senorita
2:53
Peukalo-polkka (Thumb-Polka)
2:47
Sound Samples:
Name
Time
mp3 file size
Homan'in marssi (Repaz Band)
20s
Säk'järven polka
20s
Kyyneleet
20s
Paluumarssi (Pietro's Return)
20s
Karjalan jääkarin marssi
20s
Viipurin jenkka
20s
Aaltotanssi
20s
Imatran Hilma
20s
Meidän sotiisi (Hours-Schottische)
20s
Voittajien marssi
20s
Onneton
20s
Uusi Bublitsky
20s
Vivisita (Vivacity)
20s
Kasakka-polkka
20s
Black and White
20s
Irti maasta
20s
Huoleton merimies
20s
Tukkipojan jenkka
20s
Postimies-valssi (Postman-Waltz)
20s
Ukko-Pekan polka
20s
Hullunpolkka (Viljon polka)
20s
Tamara tanssii
20s
Espanjan senorita
20s
Peukalo-polkka (Thumb-Polka)
20s
Description:
Finland Recording Index

Historical Accordion Recordings 2 is the second in a series on Finnish accordion releases from the 1910s onwards issued by the Finnish Accordion Institute.

Until 1938 Finland did not have a recording industry of its own: recordings either had to be made abroad, or European companies had to bring their recording equipment to Finland.

The very first Finnish accordion recordings were, however, made in the United States, for among the large band of Finnish emigrants were many good accordion players. One of them was Willy Larsen, later himself a celebrated teacher in New York, and Viola Turpeinen, a pupil of Pietro Diero. Turpeinen was, so far as is known, the first woman in the world to immortalise her accordion solos on record. The recordings made by these American Finns date from the period 1916-1931.

Not until 1928 did accordion recordings begin to be made in Finland. The first example on this disc is the Homanin Marssi (Homan' March).

The golden age of accordion recordings by Finnish and American-Finnish performers spanned the years 1928-1934, when the recording companies became interested in the Finnish market and began to look around for music other than opera and ditties.

The new Finnish dance music first recorded by the Suomi Jazz Orchestra, the Dallpe Orchestra and the Nils Ekman Accordion Band became particularly popular. Amid the ranks of these orchestras were some excellent accordion players who also recorded solos and duets. But because Finland had no studios of its own, these and other accordionists frequently had to travel abroad, usually to Germany or England.

Little is known outside Finland, Sweden, and possibly Germany of the many fine accordionists entertaining audiences in the late 1920s and early 1930s, such as the Italian-born Angelo Busi, Leander Norrback, Nils Ekman, plus Paavo Raivonen, who recorded in Germany and even travelled to London for concerts and recording sessions. In 1933 he took a programme of Finnish tangos to England, recording them with a studio orchestra. These recordings were later released mostly under the name of the Don Guera Tango Band.

The best-known Finnish accordionist, Viljo Vesterinen, fout times Nordic Champion, likewise made frequent visits to hte recording studios. Most of his discs date from the late1930s, by which time he had been with the Dallape for a number of years.

The Dallape also made a name for itself outside Finland through its tours to Germany and Sweden. In 1995 the Orchestra celebrated its 70th anniversary, making it the oldest band of its kind in Finland still performing.

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